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20131202
20131210
Search Results 0 to 10 of about 11 (some duplicates have been removed)
on a number of occasions, from the time he left prison to his election as south africa's president. she prepared this remembrance. >> to my generation, the onetha, nelson mandela was a towering man of myth and legend, of action and passion, of selfless sacrifice and before any of us dreamed he became the embodiment of a notorious decades long struggling against oppression, these were images from the book, mandela, the authorized portrait, helps tell the story of mandela's long road to freedom,. >>> born in 1818 on -- 1918 ons, the legend was nurtured. spending some of the happiest years of his boyhood, this is a gentle place of rolling hills and farms, where children still play as he did. in times, they would call him madiba, his clan name for respect. here, boys even ones like mandela descended by royalty, were tradition that taught respect and responsibility for others. as mandela grew into manhood, the kosa mantle, deprived and demedian mandela and his fellow africans. in 1948, oppression was legalized into a system known as apartheid. as a young lawyer in the 1940s, mandela joined t
the c.a.r. later in the program. the prime minister of thailand called for new elections today, in the face of protests against her rule. the opposition has accused her of corruption, insisting again she must go. john sparks of "independent television news" reports from bangkok. >> reporter: protest leaders called it the day of reckoning. a time to do-or-die. when their call was answered on the streets of bangkok by more than 150,000 people. and each one seemed determined to topple the thai government. >> we've got to get them out. we're playing our last card. >> reporter: they've been at it for weeks. a rolling protest against the government of prime minister yingluck shinawatra. with demonstrators converging on government headquarters this morning, the thai prime minister made a surprise announcement. she disolved the government. >> miss yingluck who sounded shaken said let the people decide who governs next. back on the streets, the prime minister's big declaration had little impact. many here don't want elections. they want something completely different. the leader of thes
revolution led to a rerun of suspect elections and mr. yanukovych's ouster from office. he seems determined not to repeat that experience. the question is whether he has overplayed his hand by giving into russian demands. the new generation of protesters empowered by the memories and failed promises of the orange revolution and the organizational tool of the internet, are equally determined not to give in. for them, this battle is about the soul of their nation. they were outraged by the government's 11th hour u-turn against an agreement with the e.u. which would have been an essential milestone towards full e.u. membership. the toxic situation here was further enflamed by the heavy and brutal hand of the police. the riot police used teargas, baton charges and stun grenades. the protesters responded with rocks. the result: dozens of injured on both sides and a foretaste of things to come in a crisis with no elegant or obvious solution. >> woodruff: for more on the protests and what it all means, i'm joined by former u.s. ambassador to the ukraine steven pifer, now a director and senior fell
to wait for the next election. i caught up with one of the >> ( translated ): normally, we give them power for four years, but they've used it in the wrong way. they're corrupt so the people want the power back. >> reporter: the decision by the police to dismantle the barricades has come as a surprise. they'd spent days defending key government ministries, so i asked them why? >> ( translated ): we did this so we could talk to each other and reduce tensions, but we are not going to let the protestors do whatever they like. this decision was made to avoid further confrontation. >> reporter: for the country's prime minister, yingluck shinawatra, a small measure of relief is expected. with the nation now preparing for the thai king's birthday on thursday, she's asked people to use the time to brainstorm. but the leaders of this protest, as well as their followers, are in no mood to negotiate. we watched at the ministry of finance, which they've occupied for several weeks, as volunteers were trained to resist and besiege. they are organized and committed to their cause, and they seem increasin
, millennials were the outliers, one of two significant groups that helped elect the president and re-elect him in 2012. up until the last year or so, they've been outliars. over the course of our last two surveys they've actually fallen quite neatly with the rest of america, looking a lot like their older brothers and sisters. we've seen that frankly that the president's approval rating has decreased by about 11 points across-the-board over the last year. significantly 15 points among women, 9 points among men. even among-- approval under 50%. >> and what do they say about the congress which we know is also seeing its approval ratings drop? >> unfortunately, those numbers are bad and getting worse. democrats in congress continue to fall and republicans in congress only 19% of all,-- of young americans under the age of 230 believe they're doing a good job or approve of the job that they're doing in washington d.c. so as bad of a day this might be for the president and those who care about the affordable care act, it's not any better for republicans in congress. >> woodruff: john, finally, i wan
with tremendous hope when nelson mandela was elected. and i think you've seen quite a bit of that hope whittled away. it's one of the most unequaled country in the world. crime remains an indem i believe problem. the education system is riddled with problems. and you also see that there is an increasing public corruption. so the current president has been involved in a huge scandal involving his private home. so people look to nelson mandela and think theres with a leader. there was someone with real integrity. so i think that this is a moment for people to look back and reflect on where they've come from and how to get back on the right path. >> woodruff: and also by definition losing what i think you call the moral center for the country. >> well, i think for many people nelson pan della does represent a kind of moral center. and a choice to turn away from violence, to turn away from strife. and to turn away from racial divisions. and instead of standing in judgement of one another, to reconcile and to admit that we did terrible things to each other. but now we're ready to move on. and i thin
Search Results 0 to 10 of about 11 (some duplicates have been removed)